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SeaLion FAQ

What size air conditioner do I need?
How often do the units need re-gassing?
How hard are the units to install?
What tools do I need to install the units?
How much will this cost to run?
What is the bottle of oil for?
Are the units "Energy Rated"?
What is the maximum fall possible between the indoor and out door units?
How much refrigerant do you add per meter of extended pipework?
How long are the supplied pipes?
What diameter are the connecting pipes?

What size air conditioner do I need?

That depends on the room volume. I tend to err on the side of caution, and prefer simplicity, so I use the Daiken formula.
Room (in meters, or part thereof) height x length x width x 45 = watts needed.

A standard-height room (2.4 meter stud) which is six meters wide by ten meters long would be:
6.4 x 10 x 2.4 x 45 = 6912 watts,
so you would use a 7/7.7K heat pump -- specifically a BLUKF(R)-70GW.

More "specific" (but subjective) formula used by another company is:
Watts used are calculated at per square meter of floor with a normal domestic ceiling height.
Old buildings, old materials, no insulation100 watts per sq. m
Buildings with some insulation factor
(and those with full-length sliding doors and full length windows along whole walls..
ie: effectively walls of glass with no insulation
80 watts per sq. m
Normal modern buildings
(insulated)
60 watts per sq. m
Modern buildings
(insulated & double-glazed windows)
50 watts per sq. m

The above formula is for the cooling requirements.
All units have an equal or greater heating than cooling capacity.

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How often do the units need re-gassing?

Heat pumps and/or air conditioners should not need re-gassing under normal circumstances. The gas does not wear out, and unless there is a leak or a mechanical failure of some type, the gas should last forever.

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How hard are the units to install?

Not hard at all. Dead easy, in fact, with the current record being held by a local professor who had one installed in under three hours. Over half the units I have sold are self-installed.

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What tools do I need to install the units?

Screwdrivers, two adjustable crescents, a couple of Allen keys, a drill (and appropriate drill bits), a hammer, maybe a hole saw, and a degree of common sense. All pipes and wires are supplied for a back-to-back installation, with the outside unit outside and the inside unit mounted inside almost directly above it on the inside wall. The outside unit needs a pad -- the most common way this is done is to use a couple of concrete pavers on the ground.

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How much will this cost to run?

This depends upon how long you run the unit for. In general, using a heat pump/air conditioner costs about 1/3 of the cost of an equivalent-sized heater. Heat pump/air conditioners are normally the least-expensive way to heat a house and the only reasonable way to cool it. They are the only source of heating I know of that converts one kW of energy in (electricity) to 3 kW of directly applied heat energy out where you can use it. Also, they add value to your house, far more than any other heat source.

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What is the bottle of oil for?

The small opaque bottle contains refrigeration oil. It is there to smear over the flare fittings (nuts that are on the copper pipes) and brass valve and joiner ends. You wont need to use it all. Its just as a lubricant to help stop any possible binding on the threads and means that you wont have to use so much pressure when you do up the flare nuts onto the post valve or joiners. You can also put a little on the Allen key (Hexagonal inside nut) and schrader valve (lower valve opening that you let the gas out through when purging) cap threads. Same reason there.

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Are the units "Energy Rated"?

Yes, see examples of "Energy Rating" certificates below.

Model KFR53GWM Energy Label Model KFR60GWM Energy Label Model KFR70GW Energy Label

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What is the maximum fall possible between the indoor and out door units?

See Table 1 below.

How much refrigerant do you add per meter of extended pipework?

See Table 1 below.

How long are the supplied pipes?

See Table 1 below.

What diameter are the connecting pipes?

See Table 1 below.

Table 1

ModelSpare Pipe (m)Diameter of the connecting pipesMaximum fall distance between Indoor and outdoor units (m)Add R22 After 1 meter longer (gm)
2.5 / 3.5 Kw3.69.52mm 3/8"
6.35mm 1/4"
620
4.2 / 4.8 / 5.3 KW3.612.7mm 1/2"
6.35mm 1/4"
725
6 / 7 Kw3.615.88mm 5/8"
9.52mm 3/8"
830

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